Grief and Trauma Resources

Grief is a natural part of life when we lose someone we love, but it can be difficult to process, especially if there is trauma involved. The resources below will help you better understand what you’re feeling and how to process your emotions so you can cope better. For more info on how Youturn Health can help with grief and trauma support, please contact info@youturn.com.

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Dennis Gillan is a survivor of suicide loss-times two! Dennis lost both his older and younger brothers to suicide 11 years apart. Despite being grief-stricken, after some time, he began to speak openly about the loss of his brothers. He realized that by talking about them, lives could be changed and saved. Listen here as he bravely tells his story which led to some major life changes and the creation of Half a Sorrow Foundation. The goal is to improve mental health for individuals and organizations by promoting real conversations. Dennis speaks to organizations worldwide and is no doubt changing the way we talk about mental health and suicide.
We have lost so many loved ones due to Covid, accidental overdose, and suicide. What does grief look like when we don’t have the chance to say goodbye? Barbara Rubel is a specialist on death and dying and shares with us her personal story of sudden loss. She is a keynote speaker, author and has dedicated her life to “inspiring professionals to handle burnout, compassion fatigue, and vicarious trauma.” Her strategies can be implemented in the workplace and her clients include more than 1,000 organizations. She is a refreshing resource that reminds us that in our human attempts to manage grief, we need to remember that grief is messy, complicated, and without a timetable.
Leslie Weirich lost her son to suicide during his junior year at Wabash College. Austin was a star athlete and stellar student with no indication of suicidal ideation. Left with questions and an aching heart, Leslie embarked on a journey to go upstream and create a network of support for adolescents to build their resilience to life. She realizes that suicide is stigmatized and her hope is that by sharing Austin’s story she will get people talking and working toward a common goal of ending young adult suicide.
Anne Moss Rogers is the author of Diary of a Broken Mind and Emotionally Naked: A Teacher’s Guide to Preventing Suicide and Recognizing Students at Risk. Anne Moss lost her 20-year-old son Charles to suicide after a long battle with anxiety, depression, and eventually, substance use disorder. Since then, she has made it her life’s mission to write and speak about mental health, suicide prevention, substance misuse, and finding hope after loss.

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